Juicing On The Go: How to Store Fresh Juice To Save Time

How To Store Fresh JuiceSo now you’ve decided that you want to start juicing but you have a big problem, time. I mean who has it.

Everybody seems to be lacking time in everything preparing for a healthy breakfast but fear not I have a solution for you so you can start eating healthier and get in shape.

One of the best solutions for busy folks is knowledge on how to store juice so can store it for up to a few months if you use the right type of container and the right kind of extraction method that I will share with you in this article.

Of course the ideal way of consuming juice is drinking it fresh out of the juicer within 20 to 30 minutes. This is recommended because you are able to get the most nutrients possible but spending 20 to 30 minutes every morning to prepare just isn’t possible for everyone so the next best solution is to make larger batches and storing them in airtight containers.

Step 1: Pick Only The Freshest Produce (If Possible Go Organic)

Fresh Produce

When you shop for fruits and veggies in a grocery or a farmers market make sure to pick only fresh produce because not only these will yield more juice but it will also give you better nutrition. If possible choose organic so you can be sure that what you buy is free from pesticides that could possible harm your health.

If you cannot afford to buy everything organic, you can refer to the dirty dozen and clean fifteen to help guide you in choosing which items to buy organic and which ones to buy conventional.

Some tips in choosing produce: When buying fruits like apple make sure that the skin is firm, if it has soft spots avoid buying it because  that is a sign that it isn’t fresh. For leafy greens like kale, choose the greenest and firmest ones you can find, avoid greens that are losing their green color and turning yellow.

Step 2: Wash your produce well

Wash Produce

The last thing you want to drink is a dirty and pesticide filled juice because you failed or improperly washed your produce.  Even if you buy organic you still have to wash it especially root crops like beet, celery or tomato because these grow from soil and you don’t want soil to go into your juice.

Washing involves soaking everything in a bowl of water filled with vinegar for at least 15 minutes then rinsing it thoroughly afterwards. For stuff like apple you can use a food grade brush to scrub the surface. If you’re juicing oranges, make sure to remove the skin but leave the pith on.

Step 3: If possible avoid chopping (or minimize it)

The moment you chop fruits and vegetable it immediate gets exposed to air and the decomposition process accelerates. Notice that when you chop an apple the inside turns brown in a matter of hours. That’s the oxidation process at work.

How do you avoid chopping when juicing? Well that would depend on the juicer that you will choose. If you like to add lots of leafy greens into your juice, something like an Omega NC800 would be a great choice because you don’t need to chop leafy greens.

All you need to do is put these greens in, stem first and let the juicer do the work. What I like about the NC800 is the large feed chute that lessens the need for chopping if you plan on adding fruit to your juice recipes.

Step 4: Choose the right juicer

Kuvings NS950 Silent Juicer ReviewChoosing the right type of juicer could be the difference between being able to store juice for one day or three days. The default most folks will pick a centrifugal juicer because it is cheaper and easier to use compared to a slow juicer but when you look at the benefits of the latter, I think it is a better investment.

Centrifugal juicers extract juice by using strainer with a shedder underneath that spins at several thousand RPM. This fast spinning action separates liquid from the pulp. While it takes less time to prepare juice, it also sucks in more air the juice that comes out looks frothier. More air equals more oxidation and you won’t be able to store it for long – a maximum of 24 hours.

Slow juicers work on a different principle. Instead of using thousands of rpm to force juice out, these machines squeeze juice out by crushing produce between a strainer and a slowly spinning auger. The auger usually spins at a very slow rate – between 45 to 80 rpm depending on the juicer and since very little air is sucked in the juice there is less oxidation and you can store it longer.

There are different subsets of slow juicers – vertical and masticating. I won’t go over this here one by one if you want more information about that, you can check out the detailed guide I’ve written about it.

Step 5: Store Juice In The Right Container

Mason Jar

While you can store juice inside a plastic bottle what I recommend is using a glass bottle with an airtight lid.

A few reasons, first because these bottles are airtight which means when you fill it to the brim you can be sure that very little air trapped inside.

Second, these bottles age well and you don’t need to replace them as often as a plastic bottle, you just have to be careful not to drop it.

Third, glass bottles don’t contain BPA and other chemicals that could be harmful to your health.

This is a hotly debated topic.

One side says that drinking water from a plastic bottle isn’t harmful while others say it is. Read both articles carefully and you decide for yourself.

If you ask me, I wouldn’t want to risk it, I’m okay with spending a little bit on the right type of bottles because not only will they last, you can also use it to serve your guest drinks with.

Tip: Make sure to fill the bottle all the way to the brim when you store juice to minimize the amount of air inside.

Step 6: Refrigerate

Refrigerate

If you’re planning to make a large batch of juice, make sure to do this last step which is storing it in a fridge. After pouring juice into an airtight container like a Mason jar, make sure to store it in the fridge to extend the shelf life up to 72 hours.

If you’re planning on bringing juice to work, I’d suggest you invest in a good cooler to keep it cool even on hot days.

Or you can freeze it

Say you are really busy and want to make a large batch of juice on an off day like Sunday then you can make a really large batch, store it in a mason jar or a BPA free plastic container then put it in a fridge.

Freezing it can extend the shelf life of juice for a few months according to this article but I would only suggest freezing as a last resort. It’s something that you do when you absolutely don’t have time or in a busy season of your life.

Drink it as soon as you can

Whether you store it for three days or three months, keep in mind that the sooner you drink it the better because your body will be able to absorb all the nutrients it craves for that cannot be filled by store bought juices.

Remember that once you thaw something frozen or bring out a mason jar from the fridge you’ll have to finish it within a few hours (again, the sooner you drink it the better!) to avoid food poisoning and don’t leave it under the sun. Make sure your room is nice and cool.

Garrick Dee
 

Garrick is the founder of Juicing with G. He created this site because he wanted to document his juicing journey which includes the mistakes he has made so other people looking to go into juicing will avoid it. He also actively researches on related health topics and posts the findings here.

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